| How does everyone feel about the taxes on e-commerce/internet purchases?

How does everyone feel about the taxes on e-commerce/internet purchases?

kyrissanean asked:


With the additional states choosing to tax internet sales, are more people going to choose to stop making internet purchases and instead choose to go to the regular brick & mortar stores? (ex. Shopping on Barnes & Noble’s or Borders’ web sites vs. going to their actual stores)
How do consumers feel about this tax on internet sales?

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Comments

2 Responses to “How does everyone feel about the taxes on e-commerce/internet purchases?”

  1. Mikw3620 on June 15th, 2009 8:57 pm

    People will still buy off the internet. People will just not report what they spent.

  2. Judy on June 16th, 2009 11:20 pm

    I’d guess that in many cases, Internet purchases are made for convenience rather than to save sales tax. Using your Barnes and Noble’s example, I both shop online at their site, and in their stores. And since they have stores in most states, most people will pay sales tax there online anyway.

    States with a sales tax generally have a law on use tax, requiring a resident of the state to pay tax on items purchased out of state - they aren’t generally enforced though.